Reasons To Why Is My Dog Sneezing

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og Sneezing

Bless you. This sentence is most familiar when someone sneezes, and it is most overheard when it is flu season. Sneezing most commonly occurs due to sinus issues or during allergy seasons, but have you wondered why does your furball sneeze?

It can result from many things such as viruses, allergies, or just playing. However, when you notice your dog sneezing, you immediately think that they are just playing. It can get concerning as anything can happen to them just as it can happen to yourself.

Playing sneeze

If you have noticed that when your dog is playing with you or other pets, they tend to sneeze sometimes. It is commonly known that dogs sneeze a lot during playtime, especially when things are getting “out of control this flea collar for dogs.”

According to experts, if dogs start to sneeze, they want to tell you that if they get rough on you, it is just for fun and that they mean no harm. It is used to communicate with the playmate to diffuse the situation and let them know they mean no ill.

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If your dog sneezes only in playtime, then it is nothing to worry about, and you should not be alarmed about it. But if they sneeze in other situations, then it can be concerning. You should consider visiting a vet to consult you and check your loved one’s health status.

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Something can be stuck in their nose

Suppose you tend to notice your dog sneezing a lot, trying to get something out of their nose with their paws, rubbing their nose on the ground. In that case, it is most likely the result of something being stuck in their nose. It can be anything like grass, hair, food, or even foxtail burr.

The plant foxtail is especially dangerous to animals as they have sharp seed which can scatter everywhere. Because dogs want to sniff anything they see, they can get it stuck in their nose, therefore damage their nose canals.

If you notice that something is stuck in their nose, you should immediately try to help them out, and if you cannot, you should go to a vet to take it out as things such as foxtails can be fatal for them.

Allergies

Yes, you have heard it right. Dogs can be allergic to something just as humans can be too. Dogs can experience allergies to pollen, dust, flea bites, food, pollen, etc. It can vary as many things can often cause an allergic response.

Suppose you notice that your dog is getting extremely itchy. In that case, you should consider talking to a vet to consult you and give you other medicine to cure anything bothering your furballs. Want to read more about allergies? If so, then check out the following link.

The reverse sneeze

Dog owners have surely noticed their dog sneezing repeatedly or even start to make choking sounds. There is an explanation for that, and it is called the reverse sneeze. The definition of this term is when your dog suddenly inhales loudly with their nose, which can sound like gagging or even choking.

Some experts say that this reflex occurs when dogs respond to some sort of irritation or even inflammation, and sometimes it helps them remove objects that are not supposed to be in their noses. In conclusion, these kinds of sneezes are not dangerous and are definitely harmless.

When to be concerned

Suppose you notice that your dog cannot breathe properly, and they start making a honking sound. In that case, they cannot exercise, or their gums begin to get bluish; it is the best advice to take them right away to the vet. There can be many answers to the question of why is my dog sneezing, but the only way to solve any issue is by trying to help out your dog any way you can.

Because most likely they will try to tell you something and all you have to do is listen to them carefully. Many other scenarios can be concerning, such as noticing that your dog is sneezing uncontrollably, coughing, lethargic, lack of appetite, discharge from nose or eyes, high fever, then it might be the result of your dog getting the canine influenza virus.

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